Yah Ribon Coding #1. C-Print, variable size, .
Yah Ribon Coding #2. C-Print, variable size, .
Yah Ribon Coding #3. C-Print, variable size, .
Yah Ribon Coding. Jerusalem bienalle, .
Creative Coding work process, .
Shifat revivim #1. C-Print, variable size, .
Shifat revivim #2. C-Print, variable size, .

PIYUT CODING SERIES Generative Art

Jerusalem bienalle. "Yah Ribon Coding". Curators: Jungsuk Noh, N. Kamenetskaya, G. Bleikh.

void main(){printf("Hello, World!");}

C First lesson, "Big Blue C"

See here: Yah Ribon Coding

See here: Shifat Revivim Coding

I have started working on the “Piyut Coding” series in 2024. During my studying of ancient Jewish poetic works, I discovered a whole series of wonderful song-verses by the famous Rabbi Israel ben Moses Najara. Israel ben Moses Najara (c. 1555, Ottoman Empire – c. 1625, Gaza, Ottoman Empire) was a prolific Jewish liturgical poet, preacher, Biblical commentator, kabbalist, and Rabbi of Gaza. He wrote piyyuṭim, pizmonim, seliḥot, vidduyim, and dirges for all the week-days and for Sabbaths, holy days, and occasional ceremonies, these piyyuṭim being collected in his “Zemirot Israel”. Many of the piyyuṭim are in Aramaic. “Zemirot Israel”, originally entitled “Zemirot Israel Najara”, was first published at Safed (1587) and contained 108 piyyuṭim and hymns. Many additional songs were printed in the Venetian edition from 1599.

“Yah Ribon Coding” is based on the words of the famous Shabbat hymn of the Rabbi Israel ben Moses Najara. The movement of the words creates an unique choreography each time it is launched. Each verse of this hymn begins with a Hebrew letter that forms an ACROSTIC - the word ISRAEL. Red strings connect the letters of the ACROSTIC and “draw” a complex graphic system reminiscent of transparent crystals. I chose red for the strings because, according to ancient Jewish tradition, red is a symbol of strength and heroism. "Yah Ribon Coding” relates to the Generative art. Thus, each animation scene is unique and exists only in a single copy. The work is the result of the code run and does not imply the preserva-tion of an unchanged image or video. The work code was written by programmer Alex Chak. Music and performance by Yah Ribon – E’s Jammy Jams is Public domain.

Rabbi Shlomo Ben Yehuda ibn Gabirol, also known as Ibn Gabirol, was a Spanish-Jewish philosopher and poet who lived during the medieval period, around the 11th century (1021, Malaga, Spain – 1058). Ibn Gabirol published over a hundred poems, as well as works of biblical exegesis, philosophy, ethics and satire. He wrote also more than one hundred piyyuṭim and seliḥot, for the Sabbath, festivals, and fast-days, most of them have been included in the Holy Day prayer books of Sephards, Ashkenazes and Karaites. "Tikkun HaGeshem" (about 1040) is one of his poetic books. This collection of poems is part of Ibn Gabirol's broader body of work, which includes philosophical treatises, religious poetry, and ethical writings. "Tikkun HaGeshem" is particularly known for its spiritual and mystical themes, often exploring the relationship between humanity and the divine.

“Shifat Revivim Coding” is based on the words of the famous one of the "Tikkun HaGeshem" book poems. The movement of the words creates an unique choreography each time it is launched. Each verse of this hymn begins with a Hebrew letter that forms an ACROSTIC - the words SHLOMO HAZAK (King SOLOMON the STRONG). Blue jets connect the letters of the ACROSTIC and “draw” a complex graphic system reminiscent of rain falling. "Shifat Revivim Coding” relates to the Generative art. Thus, each animation scene is unique and exists only in a single copy. The work is the result of the code run and does not imply the preservation of an unchanged image or video. The work code was written by programmer Alex Chak. Music and performance by Shifat Revivim – Leora Ezrachi-Vered and Ariel Lazarus is Public domain.

Shows:

  • JUST SCAN ME!. Group exhibition. The Jerusalem House of Quality, Jerusalem, Israel. Curators: Galina Bleikh, Nataliya Kamenetskaya.
  • Art and Nomads: Multiple Horizons. Group exhibition. Jerusalem Biennale 2023, Jerusalem, Israel. Curators: Jungsuk Noh, Nataliya Kamenetskaya, Galina Bleikh.